Test: God of War Iii


For many Playstation fans, Kratos and the series of which he is the hero God of war, represent the best of beat’em all… While the third opus will be available next week, here is our test of this long-awaited new release… Will it succeed, with the pressure it has on its shoulders, to meet the expectations of the fans? That’s what we’re going to see right now!

Of course, we take Kratos in hand as he is about to “climb” along Mount Olympus to go and kick the heck out of century to his love daddy (Zeus being the father of all the Greeks… or almost) with his buddies the titans. Of course Zeus doesn’t hear it with this ear, and has his buddies too! (In fact he has assembled a team of Gods) to try to repel the vile traitor. Thus, the scenario depicts the actions of Kratos who tries by all means (and with all the violence that characterizes him) to reach Zeus. The screenplay, without being “huge”, remains well written, with quite a lot of suspense. But the tone is set from the start, and there’s not really enough to go in another direction. It’s mythology, a simple and effective Hollywood-style version!

If you have played the first two opuses, you won’t have many surprises in level design. The quest is completely linear, with no branches in the levels, despite their colossal size. The inaccessible places will open up once you get the power back that’s fine. Kratos is, of course, equipped for warfare, and will collect special weapons from the bosses as you go along, which can be upgraded via the red orbs you collect in battle. At the end of the game, you’ll have almost as many moves as in Ninja Gaiden very much oriented towards attacking. Magic, on the other hand, has its own mana (blue) reservoir, which is filled via orbs of the same colour. The last gauge (yellow) is used for secondary weapons and items, and fills up by itself over time.

The game is therefore a mix of beat’em all, with platform phases, fairly simple puzzles, and item retrieval to unlock areas or puzzles. Note for example that among the items to be collected, you will find for example the head of the god Helios which allows you to light up to fight zombies… And finally, to increase the capacity of your gauges, you will need to collect gorgonian eyes, phoenix feathers and minotaur horns. We’re not joking… Next to that, there are the fights with the bosses, which are a bit of a trademark of the franchise. They’re obviously loaded with QTE, but there’s still enough classic combat to leave no trace of monotony, where you’ll have to find your enemy’s weakness to defeat him.

In terms of lifespan now, assuming you have finished the first two opuses, you should be able to get out of God of War III in about ten hours. But the Chaos difficulty mode should add a bit of challenge. The arena mode can also be useful to refine your fighting skills. In fact, God of War III succeeds the challenge of (some will say unfortunately) keeping its original gameplay, without looking at the newcomers like Dante or Bayonetta. The game is definitely offensive, and you will have to learn the rhythm of each weapon to be able to master it. Once you’ve mastered the weapons, and have the right reflex to roll when it becomes dangerous, you’ll hardly need to make defensive and counter moves…

The choice of weapons is mainly a matter of taste because they are quite balanced, it is up to you to increase the one you like the most. In any case, you can change them very quickly via the directional pad. Anyway, the bloody massacre has only one goal, to reach the finish in QTE that will throw more blood everywhere. I recommend that you play the game at the difficulty level between normal mode and chaos mode, as normal mode is not very challenging. The platform parts of the title are a sinecure, especially because of the camera, which is unfortunately fixed. The passages on the Titans are up to their marketing buzz, but if these scenes will remain anthology, they are not the best passages of the title despite everything. Like the level design, the gameplay remains very close to what has been done in previous releases.

This story is as beautiful as a Greek temple… The PS3 finally holds its title reference from the point of view of realization. Uncharted 2 had set the bar high, but Kratos and his procession of towering creatures are even higher. The titans, fully animated as we continue to fight on one of their arms, are clearly playing in a way that has never been seen before. The music is also very good, and the sound effects are very good, with a little extra for the noise of the weapons in general, which, for the little that you are hi-fi equipped, will give you chills… On top of that, the details deployed in the most gory parts (such as the blood spurts) of the title are infamous, and that plays a lot. The camera remains the most annoying point of the title, which I believe is also one of the credits of the series…

To conclude quickly, yes, it may be a bit short, and not really innovative, and it may have a level design on rails and a gameplay that doesn’t really move, but God of War III is still a Herculean production. Some passages are simply epic, and will remain in our gamers’ memories for a long time Classic, but (devilishly) effective…

The Verdict?

What does this tablet mean?

The +

– An outstanding achievement

– Epic passages

Les –

– Not very innovative

– Fixed camera very tiring

For many Playstation fans, Kratos and the series of which he is the hero God of war, represent the best of beat’em all… While the third opus will be available next week, here is our test of this new long awaited movie… Will it succeed, with the pressure it has on its shoulders, to meet the expectations of the fans? That’s what we’re going to see right now!

logogowiii

Of course, we take Kratos in hand as he is about to “climb” along Mount Olympus to go and kick the heck out of century to his love daddy (Zeus being the father of all the Greeks… or almost) with his buddies the titans. Of course Zeus doesn’t hear it with this ear, and has his buddies too! (In fact he has assembled a team of Gods) to try to repel the vile traitor. Thus, the scenario depicts the actions of Kratos who tries by all means (and with all the violence that characterizes him) to reach Zeus. The script, without being “huge”, remains well written, with a lot of suspense. But the tone is set from the start, and there’s not really enough to go in another direction. It’s mythology, a simple and effective Hollywood-style version!

If you have played the first two opuses, you won’t have many surprises in level design. The quest is completely linear, with no branches in the levels, despite their colossal size. The inaccessible places will open up once you get the power back that’s fine. Kratos is, of course, equipped for warfare, and will collect special weapons from bosses as you go along, which can be upgraded via the red orbs you collect in battle. At the end of the game, you’ll have almost as many moves as in Ninja Gaiden, very much oriented towards attacking. Magic, on the other hand, has its own mana (blue) reservoir, which is filled via orbs of the same colour. The last gauge (yellow) is used for secondary weapons and items, and fills up by itself over time.

The game is therefore a mix of beat’em all, with platform phases, fairly simple puzzles, and item retrieval to unlock areas or puzzles. Note for example that among the items to be collected, you will find for example the head of the god Helios which allows you to light up to fight zombies… And finally, to increase the capacity of your gauges, you will need to collect gorgonian eyes, phoenix feathers and minotaur horns. We’re not joking… Next to that, there are the fights with the bosses, which are a bit of a trademark of the franchise. They’re obviously loaded with QTE, but there’s still enough classic combat to leave no trace of monotony, where you’ll have to find your enemy’s weakness to defeat him.

In terms of lifespan now, assuming you have finished the first two opuses, you should be able to get out of God of War III in about ten hours. But the Chaos difficulty mode should add a bit of challenge. The arena mode can also be useful to refine your fighting skills. In fact, God of War III succeeds the challenge of (some will say unfortunately) keeping its original gameplay, without looking at the newcomers like Dante or Bayonetta. The game is definitely offensive, and you will have to learn the rhythm of each weapon to be able to master it. Once you’ve mastered the weapons, and have the right reflex to roll when it becomes dangerous, you’ll hardly need to make defensive and counter moves…

The choice of weapons is mainly a matter of taste because they are quite balanced, it is up to you to increase the one you like the most. In any case, you can change them very quickly via the directional pad. Anyway, the bloody massacre has only one goal, to reach the finish in QTE that will throw more blood everywhere. I recommend that you play the game at the difficulty level between normal mode and chaos mode, as normal mode is not very challenging. The platform parts of the title are a sinecure, especially because of the camera, which is unfortunately fixed. The passages on the Titans are up to their marketing buzz, but if these scenes will remain anthology, they are not the best passages of the title despite everything. Like the level design, the gameplay remains very close to what has been done in previous releases.

This story is as beautiful as a Greek temple… The PS3 finally holds its title reference from the point of view of realization. Uncharted 2 had set the bar high, but Kratos and his procession of towering creatures are even higher. The titans, fully animated as we continue to fight on one of their arms, are clearly playing in a way that has never been seen before. The music is also very good, and the sound effects are very good, with a little extra for the noise of the weapons in general, which, for the little that you are hi-fi equipped, will give you chills… On top of that, the details deployed in the most gory parts (such as the blood spurts) of the title are infamous, and that plays a lot. The camera remains the most annoying point of the title, which I believe is also one of the credits of the series…

To conclude quickly, yes, it may be a bit short, and not really innovative, and it may have a level design on rails and a gameplay that doesn’t really move, but God of War III is still a Herculean production. Some passages are simply epic, and will remain in our gamers’ memories for a long time. Classic, but (devilishly) effective…

The Verdict?

What does this tablet mean?

The +

– An outstanding achievement

– Epic passages

Les –

– Not very innovative

– Fixed camera very tiring

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