[impressions] Wolfenstein: the New Order New Order, Old Recipe [ps4]

[impressions] Wolfenstein: the New Order New Order, Old Recipe [ps4]


Some series never give up. Despite a last little-noticed release in 2009, the Wolfenstein license will soon have a new opus entitled The New Order. Our impressions, joystick in hand.

Wolfenstein 1

Like Nazis parachuted in packs of ten and taking the form of zombies and other mystical creatures not really morning people, each episode of Wolfenstein seems to wake up from its grave. After an opus with a title as sober as its inventiveness in 2009, the adventures of agent B.J. Blazkowicz in pursuit of Strasse continue in a Wolfenstein: New Order which we were able to approach without a pass. Nothing to do with a German-speaking drift of a new-waveband, the game taken in hand by Bethesda remains of course an FPS, but an FPS that is looking for itself.

Wolfenstein 2
Known for laying the foundations of what will nevertheless be called Doom-like for many years, Wolfenstein is intimately linked to notions of inventiveness, clearing the way and true creative hacker talk. In other words, the status is heavy to carry for the series and it doesn’t seem to live it very well. This is what emerges from the several-hour test session of Wolfenstein: The New Order. In the spirit of the previous episode, especially in terms of the preservation of some gimmicks specific to the license – search for objects, less linear levels than the competition – the game of Machine Games is set in a context.

Wolfenstein 3
A current mood where the subject passes into the background, where war shouts its love to Michael Bay. The boss of the genre, Call of Duty and his nice but less popular buddy, Battlefield, are the new trains to follow, not only to ensure a certain comfort for the player fed at Activision and Electronic Arts, but also to try to replace this series that the youngest don’t really know in a certain “modernity”. The small difference with the aforementioned fast-food approaches, comes from the fact that, composed of former Starbreeze employees, Machine Games has in its genes, deep down, the desire to tell a story. The game then takes long pauses, where it is only a question of moving forward in the plot, of discovering narrative elements in an efficient staging, in the spirit of a very, but then very decent BioShock .

Wolfenstein 4
A mix that works, but never masks the reflexes of non-play, of all those phases where the player only serves to trigger a few scripts. Again, some of the phases are very immersive, with special mention in the introduction, but it is rare to feel a high level of interaction. Qome playful flashes remain well seen and in a sense reassure people about what is happening next. Like this escape from a cremation room requiring to break all the burners in the room or this attack of two robot-nazis (yes yes) during which it is possible to deactivate one of them by activating a self-destruct button at the bottom of the truck that was transporting them. Nothing crazy, but a concern to give the player the impression that he’s holding a controller and that the environment is not just a setting.

Wolfenstein 5
Still following the current codes, the missions are very cut out, with compulsory crossing points and clearly visible diversions: oh a plane blocks the way, let’s make a few round trips to blow it up. Nevertheless, the opening of the levels allows the angles of attack to vary and a certain opening for infiltration gives a little air to thetype of partitioning. A willingness to be discreet, which nevertheless varies according to the type of level. In the manner of a Metro: Last Light, the A.I. of enemies is clearly lowered in confined areas to favor the player, especially in the castle, and is slightly raised in open areas, such as the Nazi checkpoint under attack, where guards are more suspicious.

In a few hours, Wolfenstein: The New Order asks more questions than it leads. Big strings heard, winks pressed at Call of Duty, square product, effective and not very aware of what undermines the genre a bit. And on the other hand a catchy atmosphere, a twist agreed but which opens interesting perspectives, in parallel with a gameplay which seems to tend towards a slightly looser bridle towards the player. To see if this trend is confirmed in the rest of the story of one man, alone in the face of a world full of Nazis, alone in the face of a world full of SPF.

Wolfenstein: The New Order, tested on PS4. Released May 23rd on Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3, PS4 and PC.

Some series never give up. Despite a last little-noticed release in 2009, the Wolfenstein license will soon have a new opus entitled The New Order. Our impressions, joystick in hand.

Wolfenstein 1

Like Nazis parachuted in packs of ten and taking the form of zombies and other mystical creatures not really morning people, each episode of Wolfenstein seems to wake up from its grave. After an opus with a title as sober as its inventiveness in 2009, the adventures of agent B.J. Blazkowicz in pursuit of Strasse continue in a Wolfenstein: New Order which we were able to approach without a pass. Nothing to do with a German-speaking drift of a new-waveband, the game taken in hand by Bethesda remains of course an FPS, but an FPS that is looking for itself.

Wolfenstein 2
Known for laying the foundations of what will nevertheless be called Doom-like for many years, Wolfenstein is intimately linked to notions of inventiveness, clearing the way and true creative hacker talk. In other words, status is a heavy burden for the show and the show doesn’t seem to live it very well. This is what emerges from the several-hour test session of Wolfenstein: The New Order. In the spirit of the previous episode, especially in terms of the preservation of some gimmicks specific to the license – search for objects, less linear levels than the competition – the game of Machine Games is set in a context.

Wolfenstein 3
A current mood where the subject passes into the background, where war shouts its love to Michael Bay. The boss of the genre, Call of Duty and his nice but less popular buddy, Battlefield, are the new trains to follow, not only to ensure a certain comfort for the player fed at Activision and Electronic Arts, but also to try to replace this series that the youngest don’t really know in a certain “modernity”. The small difference with the aforementioned fast-food approaches, comes from the fact that, composed of former Starbreeze employees, Machine Games has in its genes, deep down, the desire to tell a story. The game then takes long pauses, where it is only a question of moving forward in the plot, of discovering narrative elements in an efficient staging, in the spirit of a very, but then very decent BioShock .

Wolfenstein 4
A mix that works, but never masks the reflexes of non-play, of all those phases where the player only serves to trigger a few scripts. Again, some of the phases are very immersive, with special mention in the introduction, but it is rare to feel a high level of interaction. Qome playful flashes remain well seen and in a sense reassure people about what is happening next. Like this escape from a cremation room requiring to break all the burners in the room or this attack of two robot-nazis (yes yes) during which it is possible to deactivate one of them by activating a self-destruct button at the bottom of the truck that was transporting them. Nothing crazy, but a concern to give the player the impression that he’s holding a controller and that the environment is not just a setting.

Wolfenstein 5
Still following the current codes, the missions are very cut out, with compulsory crossing points and clearly visible diversions: oh a plane blocks the way, let’s make a few round trips to blow it up. Nevertheless, the opening of the levels allows the angles of attack to vary and a certain opening for infiltration gives a little air to thetype of partitioning. A willingness to be discreet, which nevertheless varies according to the type of level. In the manner of a Metro: Last Light, the A.I. of enemies is clearly lowered in confined areas to favor the player, especially in the castle, and is slightly raised in open areas, such as the Nazi checkpoint under attack, where guards are more suspicious.

In a few hours, Wolfenstein: The New Order asks more questions than it leads. Big strings heard, winks pressed at Call of Duty, square product, effective and not very aware of what undermines the genre a bit. And on the other hand a catchy atmosphere, a twist agreed but which opens interesting perspectives, in parallel with a gameplay which seems to tend towards a slightly looser bridle towards the player. To see if this trend is confirmed in the rest of the story of one man, alone in the face of a world full of Nazis, alone in the face of a world full of SPF.

Wolfenstein: The New Order, tested on PS4. Released May 23rd on Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3, PS4 and PC.

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