Intro and recommended models

For many years, when people talked about a “gamer” laptop, they referred to a high-powered, overpriced, massive machine with a rather exuberant look and minimal battery life. It was more like a high-end desktop PC (the manufacturers’ technology showcase) that could be moved from time to time.

In order to produce this dossier, we studied the configurations of manufacturers offering one or more ranges of portable PCs for gamers. We then selected the machines offering the best price/performance ratio, based on tests conducted on numerous online sites, including Tom’s Harware and LaptopMag. We’ve classified them by brand name: Acer, Asus, Dell, Gigabyte, HP, Lenovo, MSI.

Today’s best gamer laptops

Less than 1000 €

Verdict:

With its 120 Hz screen and SSD, this configuration allows you to play in good conditions, with the best possible quality….

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Processor

AMD Ryzen 5-3550H

Graphics card

GeForce GTX 1050 (3 GB)

Screen

15.6 inch Full HD 120 Hz

Memory

8 GB

Storage

SSD 256 GB

Weight

2,2 Kg

Verdict:

With its ninth-generation Intel Core i5 processor and GeForce GTX 1660 Ti chip, this configuration allows you to…

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Processor

Intel Core i5-9300H

Graphics card

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Ti (6 GB)

Screen

15.6-inch Full HD

Memory

8 GB

Storage

SDD 256 GB

Weight

2,5 Kg

More than 1000 €

Verdict:

With its 120Hz display and GeForce GTX 1660 Ti graphics chip, slightly less powerful than a standard GeForce GTX 1660 Ti, the…

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Processor

AMD Ryzen 7-3750H

Graphics card

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Ti (6 GB)

Screen

15.6 inch Full HD 120 Hz

Memory

16 GB

Storage

SSD 512 GB

Weight

2,2 Kg

Verdict:

With its 120Hz display and GeForce RTX 2060 graphics chip, this configuration is very well equipped for the most demanding applications….

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Processor

Intel Core i7-9750H

Graphics card

Nvidia GeForce GTX 2060 (6 GB)

Screen

15.6 inch Full HD 120 Hz

Memory

16 GB

Storage

SSD 512 GB

Weight

2,4 Kg

Slimmer machines

Today, manufacturers have broadened their offerings with lighter machines that are optimized for longer battery life and more affordable. This last criterion has benefited from the technical progress made by Nvidia and Intel (AMD not really managing to impose itself in the gaming notebook niche, or even notebooks at all), so that it is now possible to acquire a completely satisfactory machine for playing in Full HD for around 800 euros, with a GeForce GTX 1050/1050 Ti graphics chip and a Core i5 processor.

Of course, in order to achieve these “small” prices, some manufacturers have simplified their cases, which do not offer the same functions as the big bikes that still exist, such as Acer’s Predator, Asus’ ROGs or Dell’s Alienware.

More affordable configurations…

The Acer V Nitro (then Nitro), the HP Omen and the Lenovo Legion have been introduced to the market. For around 800 or 900 euros, these entry-level gaming machines come with a Core i5/GTX 1050 processor/graphics chip duo, which will do the trick if you’re not addicted to the latest, highly sophisticated games, or if you’re willing to sacrifice some display quality for the sake of smoothness.

These “small” configurations do not have an RGB backlit keyboard (usually just red), QHD or 4K displays, or advanced audio systems. Their display is also not G-Sync compatible and usually only operates at 60 Hz, as opposed to 120 or 144 Hz on more advanced and therefore more expensive machines.

As you approach the symbolic 1000 euro mark, you start to find graphics chips that perform better in Full HD, such as the GeForce GTX 1050 Ti or GTX 1650.

… but a top of the range still very expensive

However, once you’re aiming for a more sophisticated body and equipment, you’ll find much more expensive configurations. Indeed, the largest configurations, equipped with two GeForce GTX graphics chips (the MSI Titan for example) or the latest GeForce RTX chips and the most powerful components (Intel Core i9 processor, 144 Hz G-sync screen, 32 GB, SSD 1 TB, etc), are sold between €4,000 and €6,000.

Without reaching these extremes, it currently costs more than €2,000 to upgrade to a GeForce RTX 2070 graphics chip and more than €3,000 to upgrade to the GeForce GTX 2080…