Editorial: Pittsburgh, protect our sanitation workers

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In Pittsburgh, the refuse collection service stopped on Wednesday morning. The city’s health workers gave a striptease demonstration in the area and insisted that they had not been given adequate protective equipment to continue working during the coronavirus pandemic.

We risk our lives every time we pick up a garbage bag, said Sheldon White, head of hygiene, in an interview with CBS in Pittsburgh for the city’s environmental office. We need better equipment, better protection, we don’t have masks.

Meanwhile, health workers provide essential and vital services to the Pittsburgh community. They deserve protection if they work in these conditions – both through equipment and risk premiums.

In the light of the power cuts across the state, the government considered health workers to be key employees. As a result, despite various measures of social distance or, in the case of Allegheni County, an order for housing, they are still responsible for their work. But while many key workers can take protective measures – such as social segregation, wearing a mask or touching a small number of objects – garbage collectors often cannot.

Half the people don’t tie their pockets so if something is spilled, they tell you to take it, White told CBS Pittsburgh at a protest. Without protective equipment, workers may have to pick up tissues so that people can inflate their noses and cough.

Data collected by the CDC indicate that even brief contact with an infected surface or object, such as used tissue, can transmit the virus.

Employees raised the safety issue earlier this week after the employee’s wife received a reportedly positive COVID 19 test result. After the report was filed, EPA headquarters was cleared and officials contacted health workers to make sure they followed the protocols of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CBS said. However, the health workers drive the same car and are in close contact with each other.

In a statement, Mayor Bill Peduto said they were taking every precaution to protect the health workers.

Environmental workers are at the forefront of the city’s response to the pandemic and are doing a great service to their fellow citizens, Peduto said. We must all come together in these difficult times and continue to support the staff – including police, doctors and firefighters – who are protecting us at this time.

Sanitation workers went back to work on Thursday. However, it is not clear whether their requests have been met.

We are in solidarity with the health workers in our city – figuratively speaking, because the social distance is greater than ever. Your work is more important now than ever. They deserve to be paid for danger and protection.pittsburgh student news,pitt news opinions,the pitt news contact,pitt news silhouettes,pitt news archives,pitt news sgb,pitt protest,pitt news sports

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