Dmission Without Pravis

:lahola:


SSII

Topic:

SSII

  1. Leodams wrote: 23/08/2013 at 3:58pm.

Default Resignation without notice


  1. Good morning everyone,
  2. I need some advice to find out what my options are.
  3. Currently, I have a permanent contract with an IT services company as a director for 3 years and I have decided to resign.
  4. Here are the reasons for this descision:

    – I have never exercised as a director as defined in my employment contract.

    – I have found another opportunity that I would like to get started fairly quickly.
  5. I asked in my letter of resignation to reduce my notice period to 1 month instead of 3. I know I’m going to get a rejection from my employer, because I’m currently on assignment with one of their major clients in a management position.
  6. My questions:
  7. – What attitude should I adopt with the customer? Should I make sure I get out of the mission?
  8. – If the employer refuses to shorten my notice period, can I break my contract because the position I currently hold does not correspond to the qualification mentioned in my employment contract?
  9. Knowing that my employer didn’t make me sign an assignment.

    How can I make this turn against him.
  10. Thank you in advance for your advice
  11. Samoo wrote: 23/08/2013 at 4:10pm

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  1. it’s up to you.

    I found myself in the same situation as you at the beginning of the year. (I resigned and wanted to reduce my notice period).
  2. As if by chance, one week after the deposit of my dem letter, I am told that I am going on a mission for a client. (Client with whom the IT company did not want to work anymore).
  3. I could have done a lousy job and ruined the mission to leave early, but I don’t think that’s professional.
  4. I preferred to wait 3 months, to leave on good terms with the client, less good terms with the AD of my IT services company but good terms with all the consultants/commercials of my former IT services company.
  5. The world of IT services companies is still quite small, even if you get caught in the end I advise you to wait 3 months. It goes by quickly even if it’s frustrating.
  6. From my point of view, it’s not your role to tell the customer that you’re leaving. It’s rather the role of your salesman, the customer knows that, even if he might be a little angry with you at first.
  7. Carhiboux wrote: 23/08/2013 at 4:55pm

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  1. Hmm. As a general rule, if you want to reduce your notice period, you should negotiate it before submitting your letter of resignation.
  2. At least that’s my opinion.
  3. Afterwards, so you don’t do it. It’s complicated.
  4. Either you decide unilaterally that you won’t do it. And in that case, you risk your future ex-company claiming damages from your future ex-company.
  5. Either you play it more finely, you go to your agency head/sales rep. And you explain to him that you will only be present, and that you will refuse all missions. And you tell him that, on the contrary, if he accepts your short notice, you will do your best to ensure a smooth transition.
  6. If you are already on a mission, and the previous option doesn’t work, you can also, but this is really more risky, go and explain the situation to your client and tell him that you want him to ask your SS2I to end your mission. But now you’re in danger of getting burned by the client!
  7. phili_b wrote: 23/08/2013 at 17:15 hours

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  1. Quote
    Sent by Leodams
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  2. can I break my contract because the position I currently hold does not correspond to my qualification mentioned in my employment contract.
  3. Oh, come on. You should have thought of that when you were on probation. It has nothing to do with your obligations to respect the notice period.
  4. Quote
    Sent by Leodams
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  5. Knowing that my employer didn’t make me sign an assignment.

    How can I make this turn against him.
  6. Now you can demand a mission order.
  7. Quote
    Sent by Carhiboux
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  8. if you want to reduce your notice period, you have to negotiate it before handing in your letter of resignation.
  9. That’s the best. But in any case in a written way.
  10. Quote
    Sent by Carhiboux
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  11. Either you decide unilaterally that you won’t do it. And in that case, you risk your future ex-company claiming damages from your future ex-company.

    Either you play it more finely, you go to your agency head/sales rep. And you explain to him that you will only be present, and that you will refuse all missions. And you tell him that, on the contrary, if he accepts your short notice, you will do your best to ensure a smooth transition.
  12. @Leodams: In fact, the goal is to negotiate so that they are pushed to do so, and especially not to put you at fault.
  13. But nothing prevents you from talking to the client about your willingness to leave within the legal time limits, without getting burned by wanting to leave beforehand, depending on the relationship of trust you have with them. In any case, don’t let him be confronted with a fait accompli the day before, no matter what your relationship with them may be.
  14. In short, unless you were in intercontract or refuse an assignment that hasn’t yet started, you have a very strong probability of having to do your notice until the end…or of being sued by your company.
  15. Leodams wrote: 23/08/2013 at 5:38pm.

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  1. Samoo,
  2. The second option has already been used, but everyone sees its value.

    I remain a pro above all because I have been working with the same client for more than 3 years and everything has always gone well.
  3. Now, I thought this deal might have worked to my advantage, but it didn’t.
  4. My salesman didn’t even tell the customer I was leaving for fear that he would call for tenders and take on another provider.
  5. Anyway, hard reality is that when you’re on an inter-contract you get fired and when you want to leave you have to stay.
  6. I think I’ll take my pain as a patient and wait the 3 months by lifting my foot
    :cry:
  7. Leodams wrote: 20/09/2013 at 11:44am.

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  1. Good morning,
  2. How do you get yourself out of a mission?
  3. I have resigned and would like to shorten my notice period. I have done everything by the book,

    – Notified the client and my employer of my departure.

    – They put my replacement

    in place – I did a reversibility for 1 week
  4. And despite all this, the client wants to keep me in parallel with my replacement

    My IT services company is paid on a service and there are two people on the job, so I think it’s not going in their direction.
  5. how to get out of there fast.
  6. Do you have any advice for me?
  7. Carhiboux wrote: 20/09/2013 at 12:00 am

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  1. Within the rules yes and no. The length of the notice period must be negotiated prior to your resignation.
  2. Now, in absolute terms, your company has a letter from you saying that you are leaving with three months notice (well, it may say something else, but if your employer has not accepted the other notice, it’s three months) . So on that note… they can clearly bug you.
  3. As far as the client is concerned, I understand that. I’ve never seen a week’s worth of transfer of knowledge in my life. Especially since your client knows that you’re going to change SS2I, it’s not even as if he knows that you can always intervene in backup in case…
  4. Now, if indeed your SS2I is only paid for one guy and they send two guys, you can maybe play on that. But then again, I don’t really believe that. The deadline is negotiated beforehand. And if that doesn’t work, you have to resign yourself to doing your 3 months!
    :)
  5. Leodams wrote: 20/09/2013 at 8:50pm

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  1. Carhiboux,
  2. In my letter of resignation, I made it clear that I wanted to leave early. In return they informed me that he would come back to me if there was any possibility.

    Then my salesman told me once I got out of the mission they could let me go early.

    So my goal is to leave the mission and as you say play on the fact that he pays two guys for a job.

    I don’t think they’re going to continue paying me on an inter-contract basis (at home) for the remaining two months.

    finally I give myself hope in this sense.

    Thank you for your advice.
  3. Carhiboux wrote: 23/09/2013 at 09:59 am

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  1. In theory, when you send your letter of request, your employer should send you a letter (in person or by registered mail) confirming the receipt of your letter of request and resuming your contract end date.
  2. Your employer is then not obliged to take the date that you put in your letter (if for example you put in less notice than you are legally obliged to do) as long as it does not exceed the legal maximum (3 months for engineers under Syntec).
  3. So, it all depends on what your employer put in his letter… then what your company says… beware. As long as it’s not recorded, signed, and you don’t have the paper, it’s just wind, nothing more.
  4. Leodams wrote: 23/09/2013 at 9:23pm.

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  1. it is clear that the words are nothing but wind.

    But I think the final outcome will still be to my advantage.
  2. Because paying two people on a benefit my IT services company is not going to make this situation last.
  3. Today, the client accepted my departure and my IT services company gave me a contract end date.

    So I’m happy.
    :lahola:

    I will be able to start my new mission and my new challenge. Because there are still four months of testing to do
    :toutcasse:
    , but the risk is worth the candle.
  4. Thanks again to you!

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