Disney+

Disney+ has just deleted a handful of films because of licensing agreements: paradoxical deletions since one might think that, unlike Netflix or Amazon Prime, Disney owns all the rights to the content it offers. However, the reality is a little more complicated.

Disney+

Appropriations: Disney+

Our colleagues at Polygon have noticed the disappearance of several films from the Disney+ catalogue. A rather paradoxical situation, since one could expect from this service that nothing would ever be removed from the catalogue – given that Disney owns a priori all the rights to its contents.

In November 2019, a spokesperson for the service stated: “there will be no rotation of licensed films each month […] with Disney Plus, the acclaimed classics from the Disney fund will now be broadcast permanently, including Blanche Neigne and the Seven Dwarfs, Pinocchio, Cinderella, The Jungle Book, The Little Mermaid and The Lion King”, recalls Polygon.

So how do you explain that since then,What a dog’s life! (1959),Garfield 2 (2006),Caribbean Pirate, Dr. Doolittle,orMom, I missed the plane! (1990) and Mom, I missed the plane again! (1992), have all disappeared from the catalogue? First of all, it should be noted that Disney is only committed to keeping what it considers to be its classics permanently on its platform.

Read also: Disney+ – price, release date, catalogue… all you need to know

Disney entered into broadcast agreements before launching Disney+

Secondly, there are complications with rights. Disney has indeed signed licensing agreements with the competition. A source from The Verge confirmed to Polygon that Disney+ is still bound by multiple broadcast agreements. Before launching its platform, Disney had signed an agreement with Netflix to distribute some of its content.

Agreement whereby a certain amount of content launched on Disney+ will end up in the Netflix catalogue – if this agreement in particular still holds. Polygon notably cites films such asStar Wars: The Last JediorCocowhich could be on the Reed Hastings platform according to Polygon around 2026.

At the end of the deadlines set by these agreements, the content should nevertheless be permanently available on Disney+. The platform has chosen to communicate on what’s new in its catalogue, but not, unlike Netflix, on what’s coming out – which is rather a shame. We can expect some more movement in Disney+ content in the coming years.

Source : Polygon